Monthly Archives: June 2019

Writing For a Living

Thank goodness I don’t have to write for a living. I wouldn’t recommend it to anyone. Those that do often teach to pay the rent, to have a reliable income, or they spend a lot of time tooting their own … Continue reading

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Dew Points

The TV weather reports are using the dew points more than the relative humidity to indicate the discomfort level as being more representative of what most of us feel, although the discomfort level varies by location (Miami, where they are … Continue reading

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Train Didn’t Stop at Dundalk

I must have had a reputation for collecting odd stories for a long time. This is one of my favorites recently rediscovered as a clipping in my attic someone had sent me, but no indication of who sent it, or … Continue reading

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Lant

“Lant: Gone and Best Forgotten,” by Herbert T. Pratt. Unknown publication, June 1987. You probably never heard of the chemical lant, but a century ago, it was a common English word for fermented urine. So says Herbert Pratt of New … Continue reading

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The Saga of Dartos Tunic

“The Saga of Dartos Tunic,” by David A. Soskis, Yale Medical School, Class of 1968. “Smile A While,” Journal of the American Medical Association, 9/11/1967. (Clipping found in attic.) In the land of Genitalia, in another century Where the branches … Continue reading

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Mike Royko On Leering

(Mike Royko, 1932-1997, was a syndicated columnist for the Chicago Tribune whose column was reprinted in our local newspaper. I found this yellow clipping saved from many years ago in my attic. Here it is in its entirety, as closely … Continue reading

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Heaven

“Hereafter, Faraway,” by Viet Thanh Nguyen. The New Yorker, 6/10 & 17/2019. Author Nguyen quotes a conceit in a film, “After Life,” by Hirokazu Kore-eda that the newly dead must first spend some time in a halfway house run by … Continue reading

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