Monthly Archives: September 2018

Halls of Montezuma

So, I was talking with Gus again, the old marine fighter pilot from WWII at the senior center. In the movies and cartoons, “Gus” was always the mechanic, a wizard in salvaging shot-up airplane parts to “keep ’em flying.” But … Continue reading

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Flag Weight and Dedication To Gus

The popular size flag is 3 feet x 5 feet, and there are many places on the Internet where you can buy one. All good-quality flags are made of colored nylon fabric sewn together. That is, the red and white … Continue reading

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The Question Is Moot

A big part of building vocabulary is when a familiar word is used in an unfamiliar way. “Moot” is a good example. I have always seen it used as in “the question is moot,” and I always assumed it meant … Continue reading

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Suspenders Redux

I am still working out the details of wearing suspenders, and, its true, the devil is in the details. I was volunteering at Longwood Gardens recently, and was hoping to get advice from some Amish guys, but the intense heat … Continue reading

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My Favorite Cartoon (By George Booth)

George Booth is a long-time cartoonist for The New Yorker. He was born in 1926, and is now 92. Besides his normal cartoons, he often does cartoon covers for the New Yorker, in color. His usual iconic characters are a … Continue reading

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The Price Of a Single Copy Of The New Yorker

I was amazed when I recently noticed the price of a single copy of The New Yorker magazine: $8.99. I wonder if anyone has ever paid that much. I suppose if your grandchild had an article in one, you might … Continue reading

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Vocabulary

“Audition,” by Said Sayrafiezadeh. The New Yorker, 9/10/18. As I read, I keep my computer tablet at my side and quickly look up words that I do not know, or words I have only assumed their meaning from their context. … Continue reading

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